Have students create their own Wordle

create a worlde

I’m going to assume that you have a basic understanding of how Wordle works and are able to explain it to your students. If not, please read this post first. You will need a basic understanding before you teach students to create a Wordle.

The recent Wordle craze is an opportunity waiting for teachers to harness. Students from elementary to high school can play and benefit from the simple word game, but how can we make it work for us even more? Up the challenge by having students create their own Wordles. They could even use vocabulary or spelling words! Or we could create a Wordle for them using terms we’re working on in class.

Unlike Worlde, your unique Wordle can have more than 5 letters!

Sound difficult? It’s not. I’ll walk you through it with screenshots. Please note, I am not an affiliate nor do I receive any compensation from Worlde or strivemath.

For example: let’s say you’re an elementary school teacher. Your students are working on spelling bird words. You could create custom wordles with some of your spelling words for some fun spelling practice. Perhaps some of your words are: birds, finch, robin, and wings.

Step 1: Go to mywordle.strivemath.com to create a Wordle

You will be sent directly to this screen.

Create a Wordle

Step 2: Chose your word and generate link

Enter the word you want to use for your first Wordle. Here I have chosen “birds.” I have used a five letter word as an example, but like I said above your unique Wordle can have more than five letters!

Create a Wordle

Click on “generate link.”

Step 3: Copy the link provided and paste it in a new tab

You can click the “copy link” button or copy the link provided. Then open a new tab and paste in the link. Hit enter and you should see your custom Wordle!

Step 4: Play the Wordle!

You could call on students to guess words or have a starter word your class always uses. It will be better if you have a number of spelling or vocabulary words that are five letters long so students don’t just throw out all the words at random rather than really using the worlde.

Let’s say in our sample scenario that the class guesses “finch.” Our wordle would then look like this:

create a worlde

Students would know that the second letter is “i” and will have to decide between “birds” or “wings” on their next guess. They are learning process of elimination by realizing that it can’t be “robin” because the second letter in “robin” is not “i.” If they are astute they will also realize that the correct answer does not have an “n” so it can’t be “wings,” therefore the answer must be “birds.” They also have to spell the words correctly to get the correct answer.

Create a Wordle and play it as a whole class on the projector, or have students create Wordles for small groups on their devices.

You could make it a competition with prizes. There is so much potential here.

What kinds of objectives might you connect to a Wordle activity? How about these:

The student will use effective communication skills in group activities.

Explain what has been learned.

Increase listening and speaking vocabularies.

Organize ideas sequentially or around major points of information.

Use correct spelling for frequently used sight words.

The student will participate in and contribute to small-group activities.

Have other ideas of how to incorporate Worlde in the classroom?

Message me your ideas on Instagram (@wannabeteachersguide), Twitter (@ATeachersGuide), or Facebook (@ATeachersGuide) for a share.

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Or Start Here to check out my posts curated by theme.

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A Teacher's Guide

I am a National Board Certified educator currently teaching in Virginia. I have taught the following: English 9, 10, 11, and 12 (on academic, collaborative, and honors levels); Dual Enrollment English; Mass Communications, Yearbook, Newspaper, and Communications Technology. I have experience in five different school systems, four in Virginia and one in Maryland. I served as my school’s 2019 Teacher of the Year and was a top five finalist for the Teacher of the Year for Virginia Beach City Public Schools. I am passionate about recruiting and retaining quality educators in our public schools. Let me help you find your path to changing lives through teaching!

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